Scotland and DNA

I’ve not been sharing columns as much. Not sure why. Some have been worth sharing. I just haven’t. 

I’m working on something to say about the whole Louis C.K. situation. I’m not ready to talk about that yet. 

But here’s today’s column. Sometimes,you write a column and you think to yourself that it’s not perfect and it’s not an example of your best work, but it’s passable. It’s acceptable. So you turn it in and think nothing of it. And what a change from graduate and undergraduate writing classes, where you obsess over every word and you can’t wait to share it with everyone in class. Absolutely the best thing anyone can do if they want to be a creative writer is find a job that lets them write every day. When you spend two years producing content for a daily publication, it takes all of the ego out of even columns. The struggle changes from how do I write every day, to how do I stay on this side of the writing becoming mechanical.

This is one of those columns that I wrote, and then proofed, and then proofed again and then filed and didn’t hink of again until this morning, when I remembered to check the website and see what headline Jon had given it. That’s a fun thing about writing for a newspaper. You turn in your work and then the next day you get the greatest insight into it. It’s better than any writing workshop. You find out what the editor took from it,or liked about it, or thought was worth leading it off in the headline. 

Anyhow, this was one of the ones that a few days apart from was what I needed to reread it and see that it was actually pretty complete. They’re not always well crafted or tightly woven. Not as much as they could be anyway. And the deadlines make typos and errors inevitable sometimes. But this was one of the ones that a few days away from gave me the fresh eyes to see that it was better than what I thought I turned in. 

Anyway. 

That’s that. 

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